How Intimate Partner Violence and HIV Research Neglect Women Who Use Drugs, Sex Workers, Transgender Women, and Girls

May 2 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC | ONLINE ONLY (VIA ZOOM) | REGISTRATION REQUIRED

Welcoming remarks by
Melissa Begg, ScD, Dean & Professor, School of Social Work, Columbia University

Moderated by
Dr. Nabila El-Bassel, University Professor at Columbia and Director of the Social Intervention Group.

Featuring

Trena I. Mukherjee, MPH, Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University;
Claudia Stoicescu PhD, School of Social Work, Columbia University and Centre for Criminology, Centre for Evidence-Based Social Intervention, University of Oxford; Associate Professor of Public Health, Monash University Indonesia;
Laura E. Starbird, PhD, School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania;
Jamila K. Stockman, PhD, Division of Infectious Diseases and Global Public Health, Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego;
Victoria Frye, PhD, School of Medicine, The City University of New York;
Louisa Gilbert, PhD, School of Social Work, Columbia University; Co-Director of SIG.
Susan G. Sherman, PhD, Professor, Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Most mainstream intimate partner violence prevention efforts have focused on general populations of women rather than the key women who bear the highest rates of violence and HIV: Transgender women, women who use drugs, adolescents, and sex workers. Women are not a monolith, and a new publication in The Lancet HIV, “Intertwined Epidemics: Progress, gaps, and opportunities to address intimate partner violence and HIV among key populations of women” (https://bit.ly/3O67Vct), uncovers how to focus on these key women and address this gap in research.

Similar to addressing HIV, focusing on the general population misses the mark and ignores the broader social forces and social determinants of health that drive the intertwined epidemics of intimate partner violence and HIV among women in marginalized communities.

Now, the women who authored the aforementioned paper will be sharing their findings and discussing broader policy implications in a special discussion, moderated by Dr. Nabila El-Bassel, University Professor at Columbia and Director of the Social Intervention Group (SIG).