COMPLICATED GRIEF RESEARCH TALK: History, Bereavement, and the African American Psyche

March 5 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Location

Online

Event Organizer

Center for Complicated Grief
Phone:
212-851-2107
Email:
Website:
complicatedgrief.columbia.edu

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC | ONLINE ONLY (VIA ZOOM) | REGISTRATION REQUIRED | 1.5 CE HOURS AVAILABLE FOR A FEE

Hosted by

Center for Complicated Grief

Featuring

NICOLE ALSTON

Founder

OK2Grieve

HARRIET WASHINGTON

Researcher and Author

Harvard Medical School Center for Bioethics

Research has documented racism in the medical care of pregnant African American women from the antebellum period to the present. Historically, Black people have been considered to be indifferent parents, blamed for high infant mortality, and wrongly believed to have greater capacity for psychological and physical pain. They have been demonized while medical personnel ignored their suffering and even deliberately produced it. African American children have been used as experimental subjects and robbed of their childhood. Racism, which continues today in these and other forms, affects longevity, medical care, and bereavement support.

In this webinar, Nicole Alston will discuss her experience with Black mothers who experienced a stillbirth. Harriet Washington, author of Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Experimentation from Colonial Times to the Present, will unveil the painful history of African American women’s experiences with the American medical system during childbearing and pregnancy loss. She will conclude with recommendations for professionals and policy suggestions to redress these appalling consequences of racism and disparities in perinatal medical care.

Please see the registration page for information on CE hours and fees.