CHINA CENTER BOOK TALK: Dying for an iPhone: Lives of China’s Workers

January 28 9:00 am - 10:30 am

Event Organizer

China Center for Social Policy, Columbia University
Email:
Website:
https://chinacenter.socialwork.columbia.edu/

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC | ONLINE ONLY (VIA ZOOM) | REGISTRATION REQUIRED

Hosted by

China Center for Social Policy

Featuring

JENNY CHAN & MARK SELDEN
Sociologists & co-authors, Dying for an iPhone

Moderated by

QIN GAO
Professor of Social Policy
Founding Director, China Center for Social Policy

About the Event
A spate of Chinese iPhone workers’ suicides in 2010 placed a spotlight on their working conditions, and sociologists Jenny Chan, Mark Selden, and Pun Ngai went into action, doing extensive field research on working conditions at Foxconn, the Taiwanese-invested company that is the main supplier of iPhones. Almost ten years later, they have produced the book Dying for an iPhone: Apple, Foxconn, and the Lives of China’s Workers, which not only provides a riveting account of the lives of workers on the production line but also exposes the immense human costs of the company’s drive to dominate global electronics manufacturing. We invite you to join two of the writers, Jenny Chan (bio) and Mark Selden (bio), for a discussion the book’s main findings. For more information, please CLICK HERE.

Accessing the Event
In order to access the online event, you must register for the event. After registering, you will be sent a Zoom link in a confirmation email. The virtual room for the event will open shortly before the event begins. When you go to the link provided in the confirmation email you will be prompted to answer a few questions and then will be given the link for the webinar.

Please contact swcommunications@columbia.edu if you are experiencing difficulty accessing the event.

This lecture is part of the 2020–2021 annual lecture series on “Chinese Social Policy from Comparative Perspectives” cosponsored by the Columbia China Center for Social Policy and Weatherhead East Asian Institute and supported by the Columbia School of Social Work.