Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City (2018 Austin Lecture)

January 25, 2018
6:30 pm - 8:00 pm
Location
Casa Italiana, Columbia University 1161 Amsterdam Avenue, NY, NY

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; LIVESTREAM AVAILABLE; REGISTRATION REQUIRED.

1.5 CEUs available for NYS, NJ, and CT licensed social workers. The fee is $30. If you are from a different state, please contact swope@columbia.edu.

About the Event

In this workshop, Pulitzer Prize-winning author and Princeton University Professor of Sociology Matthew Desmond will discuss his best-selling book, Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City. Professor Desmond will speak to the devastating impacts of evictions, poverty and homelessness, and the profound challenges our national housing system faces.

About the Speaker

Matthew Desmond is a Professor in the Department of Sociology. After receiving his Ph.D. in 2010 from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, he joined the Harvard Society of Fellows as a Junior Fellow. He is the author of four books, including Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City (2016), which won the Pulitzer Prize, National Book Critics Circle Award, and Carnegie Medal, and PEN / John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction. The principal investigator of The Eviction Lab, Desmond’s research focuses on poverty in America, city life, housing insecurity, public policy, racial inequality, and ethnography. He is the recipient of a MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship, the American Bar Association’s Silver Gavel Award, and the William Julius Wilson Early Career Award. A Contributing Writer for the New York Times Magazine, Desmond was listed in 2016 among the Politico 50, as one of “fifty people across the country who are most influencing the national political debate.”

About the Lucille N. Austin Lecture

The Lucille N. Austin Visiting Scholars Program was established to honor the contributions of Lucille N. Austin, an esteemed member of the CSSW faculty for more than 30 years. The program has been made possible, in part, by a generous contribution in memory of Jane R. Heimerdinger and a grant by the Kenworthy-Swift Foundation.